6 Reasons why we love InEight Schedule

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6 Reasons why we love InEight Schedule

As professionals in planning we sometimes need to look in the mirror and accept that the way we traditionally schedule can/should be improved. We have discovered a tool, InEight Schedule, that is really disruptive in its approach to scheduling and offers a real fresh view.

In this blog post we will summarize the main challenges in scheduling and how InEight schedule is designed to solve these.

Niels Ligtvoetby Niels Ligtvoet

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Oracle Primavera Cloud – Wrap-up after 3 years of use

In the last three years, we’ve been engaged in a number of early-adopter Oracle Primavera Cloud (OPC) implementations since we first had a glimpse of what OPC was back then. Because of our close partnership with Oracle, our lessons learned from these implementations have brought a lot of realizations to the tool’s development up until today. OPC has taken shape of a versatile and comprehensive project controls tool. As it is our mission to change the way projects are managed such that projects can create more value for all parties involved, we believe our clients benefit from managing projects in a more integrated way through Primavera Cloud. In this blog post, a general overview of what the tool is capable is given to show how you can reach project controls excellence.

Niels Ligtvoetby Niels Ligtvoet

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Earned Value Management: cheat sheet

As a temporary conclusion to our Earned Value Management blog series, we’d like to provide you with an EVM formula cheat sheet. This file contains all essential formulas for calculating the Earned Value metrics, indicators and measures. Download the .pdf for free.

Niels Ligtvoetby Niels Ligtvoet

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Two + two types of Float

When using the Critical Path Method (CPM) in traditional project management software, Total Float (TF) and Free Float (FF) are calculated, which most project managers know and use. But there is more to it. We can gain deeper insight in which timeframe an activity can shift, and the effects on the related activities by calling in two more types of float. The Interfering Float (INTF) and the Independent Float (INDF). Let me tell you how to interpret them, help decision making, and support claim prevention/preparation by using these four characteristics.

Niels Ligtvoetby Niels Ligtvoet

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Time forecasting techniques with Earned Schedule

You are halfway through your project and you want to know if you are still going to achieve your project objectives. By using an Earned Value Management System, you know how to estimate your total expected costs (Estimate at Completion), but what about your deadline? Based on your current information, can you say something about the expected finish date of your project? This blog gives you an overview of how to use Earned Schedule to predict your project finish date.

Niels Ligtvoetby Niels Ligtvoet

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Planning for disaster

In times of disaster, we tend to call in force majeure on our projects, and therefore, keep our hands off. Stating no-one could foresee the possibility and impact of said force majeure, we cannot handle it within our project objectives of scope/time/cost. Both employer and contractor will take their responsibility and take a piece of the incurred damages. But can’t we plan for disaster? Are there established principles to do so?

Niels Ligtvoetby Niels Ligtvoet

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3 metrics, endless possibilities

I’m a true advocate for using (a basic implementation) of EVM on all your projects, or at least the philosophy. The use of Earned Value Management metrics gives a good insight in your current project status at a simple glance. By planning your project carefully and assigning budgets, in hours, euros, documents, resources, to your activities, a world of possibilities opens. Every project stakeholder can have their own personalized reports on their points of interest, with their own style of preference.

The level of project controls maturity has a great impact on the insight you can gain using the same, simple metrics provided by EVM. Let me take you through the different levels of reporting maturities, followed by some ideas on how to improve further than the classic methods.

Niels Ligtvoetby Niels Ligtvoet

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The To Complete Performance Index (TCPI)

How can we get the most out of our EVM metrics? We’ve evaluated our current cost and schedule performance, and have seen how to forecast the Estimate At Completion (EAC). Now is the time to evaluate the realism of our project’s Budget At Completion (BAC). Following the current conditions, is the aimed for budget still sufficient?

One of the most powerful (and underutilized) measures EVM grants us is the To Complete Performance Index. This is the Cost Performance Index (CPI) at which you must execute the remainder of the work to deliver the project within a certain budget. The budget aimed for has sometimes become idealistic. Comparing the TCPI with the current CPI gives a good insight on whether the foreseen budget or the EAC remain realistic. The difference between the cumulative CPI and the TCPI value should trigger the re-evaluation of the Estimate At Completion.

Niels Ligtvoetby Niels Ligtvoet

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Earned Schedule – The appropriate upgrade of your EVMS

Now we’ve learned the basics of Earned Value Management calculations (see this blog), it’s time to introduce a new metric to define our project’s health. As you’ve noticed all previous metrics and parameters were either percental (CPI, SPI, TCPI) or monetary/unitary (CV, SV). But what does a schedule variance of € 10.000 tell us? First, a delay expressed in monetary units is somewhat strange. Second, we will show later in this blog post that this metric is subject to a major fallacy. It is to be replaced with a more comprehensive one. Time for a change.

Niels Ligtvoetby Niels Ligtvoet

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